5 things I’ve learnt from…

1930Title

I love going to visit the Victoria and Albert Museum here in London. Every time I go there I am instantly lifted and can’t wait to get back home to channel that inspiration into something creative. I especially love that they provide courses that you can attend at reasonable prices. As part of my coursework I need to study up on the history of styles. You can imagine my happiness when I found out that the V&A were providing a lecture series called “Designing the Decades” in 2011. So off I went to learn about the decade that was 1930.

The 1930s was probably the most famous for 2 interior and architectural styles being Art Deco and Modern. Here are the highlights of what I learnt.

Note: This is a very brief highlight of what interested ME. Of course, people have written weighty tomes on this era for good reason. Please take this post for what it is, a very very very small glimpse and highlight of the 1930s from my perspective.

LeCorbusierCollage

It was at the beginning of this decade that the famous architect Le Corbusier built the Villa Savoye (above). This was a house that reflected his belief that the interior of a building should be open plan and little transition between the outside and in. Interiors should also be light and allow sun in.

ElthamPalace

Eltham Palace is one of the finest examples of Art Deco architecture and interiors available to view in the UK today.

Thewhiteroom

Syrie Maugham was a leading british decorator who is most well known for creating an all white scheme in her drawing room. It is famously called the “All White Room”. It looks just as fresh and inspiring today as it did back then.

1930RoundOccasional-Tables

 

Round occasional tables were almost always in interiors of the day along with boxy geometric furniture.

1930s-Asian-Design-Kitchen

 

The Chinese had an influence in interiors during that time and you could see this reflected in the wallpaper and interior designs of the day. While I was researching images for this post, I came across the image of an oriental style kitchen. Looking at the picture reminded me of a more modern interior that had been designed by Sibella Court an Australian Interior Stylist for a Chinese Restaurant in Sydney. Can you see the relationship between the old and the new?

 

Mrwongcollage

So what did you think? Which part of the 1930’s did you like? Was it the Art Deco or the Modernist Style? It’s going to be a nice quiet weekend for me, hopefully with some snow. I’ll see you on Monday for another Interior Style. Have a good one. xD

Image Source: Title – American Vintage Home, 2nd Image – Architecture.about.com, 3rd Image – English Heritage, 4th Image – Period-homes.com, 5th & 6th Image – American Vintage Home, 7th Image – the society inc

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8 responses to “5 things I’ve learnt from…

  • MareePSasja

    The V&A is one of my favourite places in London, and Eltham Palace is in my Top 5! I really miss being able to visit those places since we came back to Australia… lucky you, being able to indulge your interest in these wonderful places any time you like πŸ™‚

  • owlshouseblog

    Wonderful post. What a decade! So many wonderful influences. The modernist stuff was so reactionary for the times, and yet the decorative Deco so irresistible..

  • tina @colourliving

    Another great post. The V&A ‘IS’ the best museum in the world, in my opinion and I will never tire of it.

    I feel the same as Jane. The decade was so amazing that I couldn’t possibly choose. It is interesting how much influence it still holds and I often think we can learn huge amounts from history and philosophy.

    Have a nice white weekend x

    • interiornovice

      Thanks Tina, I couldn’t agree more. The V&A is a magnificent museum and such a beautiful building. Yes, we can learn a lot from history and philosophy, there are so many insightful people in this world from both past and present. Have a great weekend. xD

  • Lena

    Like Tina and Jane I like both styles, I couldn’t choose one I prefer. I think both of them are timeless.
    I’ve been reading so much about the V&A now, I guess I’ll have to go to London soon. (I’ve been there once when I was 15. Museums were not REALLY on my to-do list then…)

    • interiornovice

      Hi Lena, You must come and visit the V&A and then we can have a coffee in the grand dining room. It’s just amazing. Your comment about not being on your to-do list at 15 gave me a chuckle. πŸ™‚

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